We here at Femme & Fortune know what it means when finances are tight. Even so, one study found that almost 75 percent of Millenials gave to a charity last year. Even if you’re in no state to donate funds, there are many ways to support worthy charities—donate goods, sponsor them during a run, forgo birthday or holiday presents in lieu of donations, even a tweet of support can help raise a charity’s profile!

We decided to compile a list of our favorite worthwhile charities—in case you’re in need of a little inspiration. Each of the following organizations has a four-star rating from Charity Navigator—high praise in the world of non-profits. Check them out after the jump.

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DoSomething.org

Do Something harnesses the do-gooder power of “young people,” launching campaigns aimed at a number of hot button issues spanning the gamut—everything from animals to armed forces to sex and relationships. With a near-perfect Charity Navigator score, and more than 2.4 million participants, they not only do something. They do a shit ton.

WildAid

WildAid works to end the illegal wildlife trade. They launch public awareness campaigns and have garnered support from an extensive list of mega-celebrities including Leonardo DiCaprio, Harrison Ford and Kate Hudson. Don’t believe in the cause? Contribute just for an invite to the fundraising events.

Books For Africa

Books for Africa mission is just that: books for Africa. They collect, sort, ship, and distribute books to hungry readers of all ages in Africa, with the ultimate goal of ending the book famine in Africa. They accept donations of money or books—the perfect solution for all those old textbooks that never found a home.

http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/

Doctors Without Borders is a household name. But what many may not realize is that the organization isn’t just about providing quality medical services in developing countries. A Nobel Peace Prize recipient, the charity is also an advocacy group, speaking out “to bring attention to neglected crises, challenge inadequacies or abuse of the aid system, and to advocate for improved medical treatments and protocols.” So they’re basically Robin Hood with antibiotics.

http://www.crisisaid.org/

International Crisis Aid provides assistance in many forms—food, housing and home goods, health services, and water—through long- and short-term projects. They provided more than 200,000 pounds of food in Indonesia following the 2005 tsunami, distributed food and built a school following Haiti’s earthquake, and continue to provide ongoing services in America and across the globe. Can’t afford to donate? They’re always seeking people to help sell bracelets. Shabby chic, right?

Philabundance

Philabundance combats food insecurity in the Philadelphia area by increasing access to emergency food for those who need it most. They work within the food industry to secure food donations, which their 13 trucks distribute to those in need. Simple? Maybe, but they’re spreading the love.

Get Food Education in Every School_homepage_edited-1

The Edible Schoolyard Project aims to “build and share an edible education curriculum for kindergarten through high school.” The benefits are tenfold—students not only learn about hard work and life cycles, but they also learn about  health, the hunger crisis and environmental sustainability. And good food, which is arguably the most important.

 

Air Warrior Courage Foundation

Air Warrior Courage Foundation has a near-perfect score on Charity Navigator, and an honorable mission to boot: They provide assistance to active duty, guard, reserve and retired military personnel, who need help with medical, educational, or other expenses not covered by other governmental or charitable programs. Giving back to those who risked their hides for us? Yeah, count us in.

Living Land and Water

Living Lands & Waters crewmembers spend nine months out of the year on their barge, hosting river cleanups, watershed conservation initiatives, workshops, and environmental services. In case that’s not enough do-gooding, they also aim to plant one million trees along waterways. Oh, and they have puppies.

lemonade2

Alex’s Lemonade Stand is the kind of charity that makes your heart hurt like a Sarah McLachlan song. It’s kids helping kids—raising money from lemonade stands (and other fundraisers) to help combat childhood cancer. It all started with incredible 4-year-old girl named Alex. The foundation accepts help from big kids, too, in many forms—donations, corporate sponsorships, collecting change, hosting events, even making a stand online. Or host a lemonade stand.